Thursday, February 4, 2016

Ben Franklin S/R

Ben Franklin Quote S/R

Ben Franklin’s quote, which was written in 1759, demonstrates that freedom and liberty are more important than temporary safety. To paraphrase, Ben Franklin meant that if people are willing to give up some freedom and liberty for a little bit of safety, then they deserve neither liberty nor safety.

Ben Franklin correctly portrays how freedom and liberty are more important than safety because people who choose temporary safety over liberty, deserve neither. The American government, which is by the people and for the people, has stripped citizens of their rights. The privacy of the American people has and will be violated constantly by the government, which is supposed to be for the safety of the American people. Studies from CNN have shown that Transportation Security Administration has missed a whopping 95% of guns and bombs in recent security “red team” tests. CNN also writes, “But there's another conclusion, inescapable and disturbing to many, but good news all around: We don't need $7 billion worth of airport security” (cnn.com). CNN claims that the $7 billion we are spending on TSA annually is basically worthless, and only gives Americans another false sense of security. With the inconsistent and ineffective screenings already in use, more money should not be spent in this area. Instead, a more effective system should be put into operation. The very rare smart terrorists will easily find ways to bypass whatever we to implement. Or, they will find an easier target. These statistics are shocking, and concerning as well. Why would the American people choose to give up our liberty, freedom, and privacy when these devices prove to be ineffective? The NSA has been secretly invading our privacy for about 14 years, and the number of terrorists found: 0. With technology so advanced, and being boosted by money, a better way to use this technology must be found. Instead, the government chose to use it in order to give the American people a false sense of security. Safety is non temporary, while freedom and liberty should be permanent. However, by invading some privacy of the American people, the government provides safety. Although no terrorists have been found through security screenings, these devices stop potential danger, and could stop terrorists from even thinking about doing anything in the first place. Martin Rivers, a writer for The Guardian, agrees that things like airport security are extremely necessary in keeping America safe. Rivers writes, “As long as al-Qaida is devoted to finding gaps in airport security, we must be devoted to plugging them” (Rivers). Martin Rivers, along with many other Americans, believe this is one of many necessary inconveniences the citizens of America must go through in order to be safe. Aviation officials must wake up to the game changing threat new terrorists pose. Although some controversy, there has been success in the attempt to stop terrorism through airports. Since 9/11, there has been zero terrorist attacks on any plane in America. Also, by going through social media and using security cameras, the government stops terrorist attacks before they even become a plan. The government also needs to monitor the Internet just as they need to set speed limits on the public roadways. Without some monitoring and regulation, the population would run amok and be a threat to each other. As an American citizen, putting something on the internet is completely a choice. If you don’t have something to hide, then you should not be worried about what the government does. In short, what the government does regarding privacy issues and the rights of American citizens, is only an attempt to maintain national security, and keep the American people safe. At first glance, it might seem as if giving up our freedom for interim safety might be a good idea. This does seem compelling because devices such as surveillance cameras and security screenings are there for our safety, and do in fact help protect the American people. This is a helpful interpretation, but it is missing a key point. Although the intention of these security devices might appear good, it is only giving Americans a false sense of security. While safety does seem tempting, it is only temporary. Freedom and liberty is a right that should be permanent, and should not be taken away for something that can only last a small period of time. These rights may never return. Obviously the terrorists have easily found ways to go around the little security our government has to offer, as shown through events such as Paris, San Bernardino, and the bombing in Boston. The whole nation agrees that these tragedies must come to an end, yet the government’s actions toward this concern don’t seem to be helpful. The government has no right to invade our private lives by monitoring our internet activities. Such would be like having federal agents inspecting your mail, tracking the stores you went to and the things you purchased, or barging into your homes and searching, just to "make sure" you aren't engaging in any illegal activities. Of course the government should investigate reports of suspicious behavior, just like in the "real world". The internet is no different. If you think about it, the internet is really no more than an advanced mail service, which in turn is not more than an advanced way of conversing with another person. No one would stand to have federal agents following them around all day to listen to their conversations. Activities on the internet are extremely similar. The message that Ben Franklin sends is that freedom and liberty are far more important than short-term safety. The American citizens who choose safety over anything else, should deserve neither safety nor liberty.

Monday, October 12, 2015

Othello Act 5 Redo

Othello Act 5 Summary Response Redo
Summary: William Shakespeare’s Othello act 5, indicates that manipulation fuels betrayal. Iago, who uses manipulation to control his “peers” all throughout the story, is up to his old tricks once again in act 5. He truly does not care for anyone but himself, and a plethora of masks are used to disguise Iago’s true evil spirit. The overabundance of masks that Iago uses all create manipulation, which ultimately leads to acts of betrayals. Othello act 5, by Shakespeare, reveals how manipulation is the fuel of ultimate betrayal.

Reponse
Claim: Othello act 5, by William Shakespeare, correctly portrays how manipulation fuels betrayal because Iago’s manipulative ways fuel his acts of betrayal upon Roderigo.  In act 5, Iago ends up being the one who kills Roderigo. Roderigo was “friends” with Iago all along, yet it is Iago who impales Roderigo in the end. Iago was constantly using Roderigo as his pawn, always getting him to do what he wants. Iago comforts his friend, and supports him as well. This is all part of Iago’s master plan, and betrayal ends up being the tragic outcome of this cruel plan. After Cassio and Roderigo both were wounded, Iago comes in and stabs Roderigo. Roderigo is absolutely livid, and yells, “O damned Iago! O inhuman dog!” (Shakespeare 5.1 229). Roderigo is shocked and angry at Iago, for he has been stabbed in the chest by a man he knew dearly, and it ends up being lethal. Roderigo accuses of Iago of being a manipulative man, and Roderigo is basically solving Iago’s puzzle, but only to die a few moments later. Roderigo is the first man to see Iago’s plan, and understands that he has been used like a pawn’s. Iago’s constant betrayal is being fed by his own manipulative tricks. Iago’s tool of manipulation is the most powerful thing in Othello, and one can see that Iago’s dominant tool is powering his betrayal.

Counterclaim: However, while one might think that Iago uses manipulation for betrayal on Roderigo, the reader can actually see that Iago is a caring man who commits acts because of friendship and love. After Cassio and Roderigo’s brawl had started, Iago was the man to murder Roderigo in the end. Iago does this act out of care for Cassio, and one can see that Iago is actually a hero. Othello also notes of Iago’s noble acts, and kindly compliments Iago by saying, “‘Tis he! Oh, brave Iago, honest and just, That hast such noble sense of thy friend’s wrong! Thou teachest me” (Shakespeare 5.1 225). Now that Othello believes that Cassio is dead, he thanks Iago and states that this is how he himself should act. Iago’s acts are not ignoble, and Othello certainly notices this enduring quality that Iago withholds. Betrayal is the antithesis of what Iago is doing, and manipulation isn’t the tool that he uses to obtain his goals. Iago gushes with honesty and care, and one can see that betrayal isn’t the cause of manipulation in act 5 of Othello.

Rebuttal: At first glance, one might think that Iago is a noble man, who engages in murder only to help his dear friend Cassio. This is a compelling point because even Othello himself exclaims that he himself should act like Iago, and Othello also thanks Iago for what he has done. In addition, one can see that Iago is a hero by avenging Cassio. This is a very helpful interpretation, but it misses an important point. As a matter of fact, Iago is actually a cruel, evil man who feasts upon his friends with the power of his manipulation. Roderigo, Othello among others, are all just objects in relation to Iago, and Iago certainly uses each and every one of them. Roderigo’s death is the result of betrayal and manipulation, and it is Emilia who eventually spills the truth about Iago. Throughout the book, the reader can see that Iago is just a boor who uses manipulation to fuel his betrayal.

Conclusion: In the end, manipulation is the fuel of betrayal, and Shakespeare’s Othello act 5 definitely signifies this.

Sunday, October 4, 2015

Othello Act 5 Summary Response
Summary: William Shakespeare’s Othello act 5, indicates that manipulation fuels betrayal. Iago, who uses manipulation to control his “peers” all throughout the story, is up to his old tricks once again in act 5. He truly does not care for anyone but himself, and a plethora of masks are used to disguise Iago’s true evil spirit. Othello act 5, by Shakespeare, reveals how manipulation is the fuel of ultimate betrayal.

Reponse
Claim: Othello act 5, by William Shakespeare, correctly portrays how manipulation fuels betrayal. In act 5, Iago ends up being the one who kills Roderigo. Roderigo was “friends” with Iago all along, yet it is Iago who impales Roderigo in the end. Iago was constantly using Roderigo as his pawn, always getting him to do what he wants. Iago comforts his friend, and supports him as well. This is all part of Iago’s master plan, and betrayal ends up being the tragic outcome of this cruel plan. After Cassio and Roderigo both were wounded, Iago comes in and stabs Roderigo. Roderigo is absolutely livid, and yells, “O damned Iago! O inhuman dog!” (Shakespeare 5.1 229). Roderigo is shocked and angry at Iago, for he has been stabbed in the chest by a man he knew dearly, and it ends up being lethal. Roderigo accuses of Iago of being a manipulative man, and Roderigo is basically solving Iago’s puzzle, but only to die a few moments later. Roderigo is the first man to see Iago’s plan, and understands that he has been used like a pawn. Iago’s tool of manipulation is the most powerful thing in Othello, and one can see that Iago’s dominant tool is powering his betrayal.

Counterclaim: However, while one might think that Iago uses manipulation for betrayal on Roderigo, the reader can actually see that Iago is a caring man who commits acts because of friendship and love. After Cassio and Roderigo’s brawl had started, Iago was the man to murder Roderigo in the end. Iago does this act out of care for Cassio, and one can see that Iago is actually a hero. Othello also notes of Iago’s noble acts, and kindly compliments Iago by saying, “‘Tis he! Oh, brave Iago, honest and just, That hast such noble sense of thy friend’s wrong! Thou teachest me” (Shakespeare 5.1 225). Now that Othello believes that Cassio is dead, he thanks Iago and states that this is how he himself should act. Iago’s acts are not ignoble, and Othello certainly notices this enduring quality that Iago withholds. Betrayal is the antithesis of what Iago is doing, and manipulation isn’t the tool that he uses to obtain his goals. Iago gushes with honesty and care, and one can see that betrayal isn’t the cause of manipulation in act 5 of Othello.

Rebuttal: At first glance, one might think that Iago is a noble man, who engages in murder only to help his dear friend Cassio. This is a compelling point because even Othello himself exclaims that he himself should act like Iago, and Othello also thanks Iago for what he has done. In addition, one can see that Iago is a hero by avenging Cassio. This is a very helpful interpretation, but it misses an important point. As a matter of fact, Iago is actually a cruel, evil man who feasts upon his friends with the power of his manipulation.

Conclusion: In the end, manipulation is the fuel of betrayal, and Shakespeare’s Othello act 5 definitely signifies this.

Thursday, September 24, 2015

Othello Act 2 Summary/Response REDO
Spencer Cobb and Collin Sailor

Summary: William Shakespeare’s Othello, act 2, illustrates that dishonesty and manipulation lead to evil acts. Iago uses Roderigo as a pawn, and wears many masks to disguise his true identity. When Iago defends Cassio and “befriends” him shortly after the fight between Montano and Cassio, Iago sets up his master plan to trick Othello. One can easily see that honesty is a big theme thus far in Othello, and obviously, Iago is not an honest man.

Response:
Claim 1: Othello act 2, by William Shakespeare, correctly portrays how Iago’s manipulation and dishonesty leads to evil acts. His acts are ignoble and shameful, but only the readers are able to see through the eyes of Iago. In scene 3 when Michael Cassio gets into the drunken fight with Montano, he is stripped of his lieutenancy. Cassio has a lot of regret about drinking, and says that the stupid wine spoiled his reputation. Iago seizes this opportunity to trick Cassio into spending a lot of time with Desdemona to build his reputation back up, but so that it looks like the two are in love. Iago is able to do this by putting on a mask and not really showing the real him,”When devils will the blackest sins put on, they do suggest at first with heavenly shows”(Shakespeare 2.3.371-372). He relates what he is doing to an act of the devil, thus showing how deceptive and dishonest he is. A reader can see that Iago has one side, and that is pure evil, but to Othello and the others, he is seen as a caring, honest, and warm-hearted man.  

Counterclaim 1: However, one can see how Iago is actually a loving, caring man, and is completely honest. After the dangerous fight between Montano and Michael Cassio, Iago defends Cassio and comforts him after losing his lieutenancy. When Othello asks who started the fight, Iago talks up Cassio in a way, saying that it wasn’t all his fault and that Cassio is a good man. Othello knows that Iago is stretching the truth to help out Cassio’s case, “I know, Iago, Thy honesty and love doth mince this matter, Making it light to Cassio” (Shakespeare 2.3 262-264). Othello is not upset about Iago’s choice to defend Cassio, for he is only speaking his own opinion, and thinks that it is honorable that he is standing up for Cassio like that. Iago isn’t manipulative, but instead an honest man who only speaks his own opinion.

Rebuttal: At first glance, one might think that Iago is an honest and caring man that doesn’t use manipulation to get his way. This conclusion does seem compelling because one can see that Iago does truly care for Cassio and shows his loving emotions when he defends Cassio after the fight between Michael Cassio himself and Montano. This is a helpful interpretation, but it misses an imperative point. One might think that Iago is an honest, caring, and loving person, when the truth is, Iago is a manipulative man who uses his evil ways to get what he wants. One can see Iago’s dishonesty when he tricks Cassio into spending more time with Desdemona, eventually with Iago’s desire for Othello to hate Cassio. Love and lieutenancy, two of the possible motives for what Iago is attempting. On the outside, Iago might seem like a friendly, warm-hearted lad who is always willing to give a helping hand, but that is a completely wrong understanding of this cruel man. Iago is a boor, feeding on others feelings to get what he wants. Iago is the face of dishonesty, as William Shakespeare signifies throughout act 2.

Conclusion: In the end, act 2 of Othello by William Shakespeare, strongly demonstrates how Iago is a fraudulent man who uses his many masks to disguise his evil.

Thursday, September 17, 2015

Othello Act 2 Summary/Response

Summary: William Shakespeare’s Othello, act 2, illustrates that Iago is a dishonest man and is very manipulative just to get what he wants. He uses Roderigo as a pawn, and wears many masks to disguise his true identity. When Iago defends Cassio and “befriends” him shortly after the fight between Montano and Cassio, Iago sets up his master plan to trick Othello. One can easily see that honesty is a big theme thus far, and obviously, Iago is not an honest man.

Response:
Claim 1: Othello act 2, by William Shakespeare, correctly portrays how Iago is a very manipulative, dishonest man. His acts are ignoble and shameful, but only the readers are able to see through the eyes of Iago. In scene 3 when Michael Cassio gets into the drunken fight with Montano, he is stripped of his lieutenancy. Cassio has a lot of regret about drinking, and says that the stupid wine spoiled his reputation. Iago seizes this opportunity to trick Cassio into spending a lot of time with Desdemona to build his reputation back up, but so that it looks like the two are in love. Iago is able to do this by putting on a mask and not really showing the real him,”When devils will the blackest sins put on, they do suggest at first with heavenly shows”(Shakespeare 2.3.371-372). He relates what he is doing to an act of the devil, thus showing how deceptive and dishonest he is.

Counterclaim 1: However, one can see how Iago is actually a loving, caring man, and is completely honest. After the dangerous fight between Montano and Michael Cassio, Iago defends Cassio and comforts him after losing his lieutenancy. When Othello asks who started the fight, Iago talks up Cassio in a way, saying that it wasn’t all his fault and that Cassio is a good man. Othello knows that Iago is stretching the truth to help out Cassio’s case, “I know, Iago, Thy honesty and love doth mince this matter, Making it light to Cassio” (Shakespeare 2.3 262-264). Othello is not upset about Iago’s choice to defend Cassio, for he is only speaking his own opinion, and thinks that it is honorable that he is standing up for Cassio like that. Iago isn’t manipulative, but instead an honest man who only speaks his own opinion.

Rebuttal: At first glance, one might think that Iago is an honest and caring man that doesn’t use manipulation to get his way. This conclusion does seem compelling because one can see that Iago does truly care for Cassio and shows his loving emotions when he defends Cassio after the fight between Michael Cassio himself and Montano. This is a helpful interpretation, but it misses a very important point. One might think that Iago is an honest, caring, and loving person, when the truth is, Iago is a manipulative man who uses his evil ways to get what he wants. One can see Iago’s dishonesty when he tricks Cassio into spending more time with Desdemona, eventually with Iago’s desire for Othello to hate Cassio. Love and lieutenancy, two of the possible motives for what Iago is attempting. On the outside, Iago might seem like a friendly, warm-hearted lad who is always willing to give a helping hand, but that is a completely wrong understanding of this cruel man. Iago is a boor, feeding on others feelings to get what he wants. Iago is the face of dishonesty, as William Shakespeare signifies throughout act 2.

Conclusion: In the end, act 2 of Othello by William Shakespeare, strongly demonstrates how Iago is a fraudulent man who uses his many masks to disguise his evil. Honesty, as well as dishonesty, is an essential theme in Othello throughout the whole second act, especially with the character of Iago.
Othello Act 1 Summary/Response Redo
Collin Sailor and Spencer Cobb
Summary: Shakespeare’s Othello, act 1, demonstrates that jealousy fuels anger which can lead to acts of revenge. Iago’s anger is easily seen through from the reader’s point of view, but not necessarily from the characters in the story. Iago is angered by Othello’s choice to choose Michael Cassio as Othello’s lieutenant, and he wants revenge on Othello. Iago’s anger and jealousy quickly sparks his desire for revenge on Othello. One can see throughout act 1 that these ideas supply the reader with the idea that jealousy does fuel anger and further actions.



Response:
Claim 1: Act 1 of Othello, by William Shakespeare, correctly portrays that jealousy does in fact fuel anger which can lead to acts of revenge because through Iago’s speech, one can see that his jealousy of Othello’s choice to pick Michael Cassio as his lieutenant makes him very angry, which is shown when Iago states, “‘I hate the Moor’”(Shakespeare 1.3.429). Othello has chosen Cassio INSTEAD of Iago, and Shakespeare shows that Iago is angered by Othello, and Iago’s jealousy and anger could be a cause for a future act of revenge. Iago has put on one of his many masks, causing Othello to still believe that him and Iago are friends. Iago could use this as a perfect opportunity to betray him when Othello least expects it.
Counterclaim 1: Although it may seem like Iago is starting to plot revenge on Othello because of his jealousy of Michael Cassio, one can see that he is just upset at the moment and will eventually get over it. Everyone has gone through a difficult situation where they don’t get what they wanted, and it is upsetting. Iago is in that situation and will eventually realise that it’s a silly thing to hold a grudge against Othello for this. It is shown through the text that Iago helps other people out with their problems, for example, when he talks Roderigo out of committing suicide, he shows him that there is much more to life and that it will get better, “If thou dost, I shall never love thee after. Why, thou silly gentleman!”(Shakespeare 1.3.348-349) All Iago needs is a good friend that will help him get through this like he has helped Roderigo. The first interpretation of Iago is wrong, and he is actually a caring, warm-hearted man who is helping his friends out.

Rebuttal: At first glance, one might think that anger of jealousy aren’t the whole reason for revenge, and that these two feelings are just temporary. This conclusion seems very compelling because one can see that anger and jealousy are just temporary, and that Iago’s many masks are covering his true emotions. This is a helpful interpretation, but it misses an important point. Jealousy and anger do in fact fuel the further acts of revenge. The beast within Iago is slowly being unleashed by his anger and jealousy for the acts that have occurred. Iago has been bottling it all up, and eventually, he’s going to burst. Ultimately, all throughout act 1, Iago perfectly portrays how jealousy fuels anger, which can lead acts of revenge through what he says in conversations either to himself or to others.







Conclusion: In the end, anger truly does fuel possible acts of revenge. Iago’s anger is building up inside of him, and he masks his anger with his many disguises. The beast within Iago seems to be banging on the door, wanting to escape and take over Iago’s actions. With Othello, Iago is a friendly man who wants to “help” Othello. With Roderigo, he pretends to like him and care for him, only to get Roderigo to hate Othello even more. Iago is a manipulative and angry person, and now one can only wait for what is to come from the beast that is Iago. Ultimately, one can see that Iago’s anger is fueling the possibility of revenge.

Monday, September 14, 2015

Spencer Cobb/Collin Sailor Bully Summary Response Redo



Summary
Lee Hirsch’s Bully illustrates the lives of young people throughout their intense journey of bullying. Self harm and even the tragic outcome of suicide can be the result of being picked on every day; whether it is on the bus, online, or in the classroom, it doesn’t matter. The constant torture of being abused both physically and mentally can sometimes be too much for someone to handle alone. Anyone who stands by and watches someone being attacked, either through fists or words, and doesn’t do anything about it is just as bad as the actual bullies.



Response
Claim 1: Bully, by Lee Hirsch correctly portrays how bystanders are just as bad as the bullies themselves because bystanders are just the crowd and encouragement for the bully. As Alex, a 13 year old victim, is constantly bullied and harassed everywhere, one can see that teachers don’t help, and other kids just watch or join in. He doesn’t tell his own parents, and is having a very tough time. Every time he gets back up, he is pushed down again and again, both physically and mentally. He is called names, beat up, even sat on. He is pushed to the point where he has gone through so much that his mother is scared that “‘He doesn’t feel anything anymore’”(Hirsch). This is not only caused by the unthinkable behavior of the bullies, but the absence of help as well. The actions of the bystanders are just supplying the ingredients to a crowd and a bullies encouragement, and ultimately pushing the bully to new heights.

Counterclaim 1: However, it is not the fault of the bystander that the kid, in this case Alex, is getting bullied. Lee Hirsch does show that the bystanders are not at fault at all because they just happen to be at the same place as them by coincidence. For example, in the lunchroom, when Alex gets his food taken and tray hit out of his hand, there are many people in the room, so by that logic that must mean everyone in the cafeteria is at fault. The only time they would be to blame is if they watch it happen consistently and still do nothing about it. Another reason that the bystanders should not be blamed is because if they try to stand up for the victim, they may get bullied for being the one trying to befriend the “nerd, fish face, weirdo”, or whatever one might call the victim. In the film, the vice principal talks to the bystanders and they don’t get punished for being in the same place at the wrong time, so there must be nothing wrong with bystanding.

Rebuttal: At first glance, bullying seems to be a problem between two people, the bully and the victim. This conclusion seems very compelling because throughout Bully, on many different occasions, the victim was being directly linked with the bullies. Alex, Kelby, Tyler and more were all talked about in relation to the bullies who harass them. This is a helpful interpretation, but it is missing a key point. The bullies themselves aren’t the ones causing all the damage, and they are not even causing half the damage. Bystanders are the ones who stand on the side, watching a terrible scene unfold right in front of their eyes. Bystanders are the ones that are silently encouraging the bully further, and are the reason some victims never receive help. If a bystander or two did the right thing and stood up for the victim, the bullying would stop there, and it wouldn’t be an ongoing thing. Instead of being unhelpful bystanders, they need to do the morally correct thing and stick up for the victim. Ultimately, Bully is a story that definitely depicts how bystanders are a huge problem in bullying.

Conclusion: In the end, Lee Hirsch’s Bully demonstrates how bystanders are just a big of problem as the bullies themselves. They need to stand up for the victim, because most of the time, one person can’t stand up against the bully. Not only does the victim have to defend himself against his/her oppressor, but the victim must also have the courage to do whatever they normally do, with the troubling fear that they will get bullied. Bystanders need to step up and defend the victims in order to stop this.